Categories
Blog Social Issues

Talks with the Taliban? Think again!

The Right-wing political parties gained the upper hand in the May 11th 2013 General Elections in Pakistan; parties like the PML-N, PTI and JUI-F had massive popular support. The Left-wing, liberal parties like the PPP and the ANP suffered grave losses. With ‘Talks and Peace deals with the Taliban’ amongst their top agendas, these winning Right-wing parties were adamant on putting an end to Pakistan’s War on Terrorism: actually a War for wrestling control from the Taliban and establishing the writ and sovereignty of Pakistan on its North-Western territories.

The Afghan Taliban armed to the teeth with lethal weaponsTo the dismay of these political and politico-religious parties, the Taliban withdrew the peace offer after its second-in-command Waliur Rehman was killed by a US drone strike on Pakistani territory on 30th May 2013. Soon after the attack, Imran Khan, chief of the PTI, was seen on news channels telling the then MNA-elect Nawaz Shareef, now the Prime Minister of Pakistan, to either stop the drone strikes or shoot the drones down.

On 29th May 2013 a petition was filed in the Supreme Court of Pakistan, which sought a declaration by the Supreme Court against negotiations by any person, civilian or military, with a forbidden private army waging war against Pakistan.

The petition was filed by Mr. Shahid Orakzai under the Supreme Court’s original jurisdiction on the enforcement of fundamental rights, asked how could the armed forces propose a truce/ceasefire/end of hostilities to the rebels on the territory of Pakistan? The petitioner also asked whether a citizen was empowered by the constitution to negotiate peace with a private army waging war on Pakistan. However the Supreme Court Registrar Office had returned his petition by raising objections that he had no locus standi to file the petition.

Article 256 Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan forbids and outlaws any private army within the territory of Pakistan:

256. Private armies forbidden.
No private organization capable of functioning as a military organization shall be formed, and any such organization shall be illegal.

The Taliban are a private army/rebel group, waging war against Pakistan since the beginning of the 21st Century, on Pakistani territory. They have killed and slaughtered over 50,000 Pakistani men, women, children, politicians and leaders, police officers and army officers; they have slain many social workers especially those working for the eradication of the Polio virus. The Taliban out rightly reject the democratic system of Pakistan, its legal system, sovereignty of the Parliament over the territories of Pakistan.

Regarding the activities of some politico-religious groups which support the Taliban and/or peace talks with them, Article 5 of the constitution of Pakistan clearly states the following:

5. Loyalty to State and obedience to Constitution and law.

  1. Loyalty to the State is the basic duty of every citizen.
  2. Obedience to the Constitution and law is the inviolable obligation of every citizen wherever he may be and of every other person for the time being within Pakistan.

Afthermath of a Taliban attack, sudide bombingUnder the provisions of Article 5 of the constitution, would it not be that, according to the constitution of Pakistan, any Pakistani keeping contacts with, communication with, aiding or abetting the rebels waging war against Pakistan, would be committing acts treason? Leaders of our winning political parties, Nawaz Shareef of PML-N, Imran Khan of PTI, Fazal-ur-Rehman of JUI-F, all have been in contact with the Taliban, our media who receive calls of Taliban’s spokesperson Ehsanullah Ehsan when he calls to proudly claim responsibility of terrorist activities his organization carries out, Imams of mosques in rural and urban areas of Pakistan who openly sympathize with these terrorists, are they all not guilty of treason? I do not intend to accuse anyone; interpretation of the Constitution is the responsibility of the Supreme Court, which recently failed to take up the above mentioned petition.

In the video below you can see what the Taliban does in the areas it controls. The video below shows extremely violent acts committed by the Taliban (decapitating humans), NOT suitable for children, those with a weak heart and certainly NOT for those who do not wish to watch it. Be advised.

UPDATE: The copy of this video hosted on Vimeo, earlier embedded here, was removed by Vimeo staff because “it depicts extreme violence”, The video has been replaced by the same copy hosted on this server.

Categories
Blog Social Issues

Pakistan General Elections 2013: An Overview

A ballot paper being inserted in the ballot box in Pakistan General Elections 2013Pakistanis voted on May 11th, 2013: it was followed by the first democratic transfer of power in Pakistan. The general elections were largely free and fair, with the exception of some alleged rigging in Karachi, and some other parts of the nation. The polls recorded a massive, highest ever turnout of 60%.

The polls saw Nawaz Sharif’s PML-N rise to power at the center and stay entrenched in Punjab, the largest province of the nation. Imran Khan’s PTI got a chance to set up a coalition government with the Jamaat-i-Islami in the troubled province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Sindh will see a coalition of the PPP and probably the MQM, and a coalition government of Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party, National Party and the PML-N in Balochistan.

Surprisingly, the former ruling PPP and its allies the PML-Q and the ANP faced bitter defeat. It seems as if, in the words of the Chief Justice of Peshawar High Court, “the people avenged the former rulers”.

Democracy - Everyone is equal and respected!In Pakistani elections, there’s never defeat; there’s victory for one, and rigging for others. For the first time in Pakistani history, ANP accepted its defeat. Never had a political party displayed this great level of maturity and accepted the shortcomings of its government for its defeat in election. The others blamed rigging, the establishment and whatever their vivid imaginations could draw.

Categories
Blog Tribute

Happy Mother’s Day

This video is made for and dedicated to my mom; undoubtedly the best mother in the whole wide world! I really love you a lot! I know you love me more than anything else in the world! I always pray and wish for the best for you and would do anything for you; just like you do for me! You mean the world to me mummy! 🙂

Thank you mama for making me what I am today! You have been a constant companion, a friend and the best teacher I ever had and would ever have! Your constant motivation and your guidance has made me what I am today! Thank you for everything! You’re the best maa ever! 🙂

Happy Mother’s Day aami jaan 🙂

Categories
Blog Social Issues

Pakistan: Vote now!

A ballot paper being inserted in the ballot box in Pakistan General Elections 2013On 11th May 2013, the people of Pakistan will vote and elect our Parliament’s lower house, the National Assembly; along with the Provincial Assemblies of the four Provinces. This will be a landmark day, that will decide the future of Pakistan for the next 5 years to come. This day, Pakistani’s will, according to their wishes elect their representatives to rule the country for a mandate of 5 years.

Electing our government is not just our right, enshrined by our Constitution and the Law of our land, or by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed by our founding fathers; it is, I believe, an obligation, a responsibility, that we owe to our nation. Casting our votes wouldn’t just be exercising of our constitutional rights, but fulfillment of our responsibility and our obligation towards our nation and our effort for a better, brighter future.

Election Commission of PakistanBeing citizens of a democratic state it is not just our right to be a part of, or be represented in, the government of our country; it is our obligation! We share as much guilt and sins as our corrupt and/or bad politicians. Why? Because they have had been our representatives, and ruled our nation on our mandate! And for those who overthrew our elected governments and assumed control of our nation, well our silence and ignorance was their approval to plunder our nation, and our money which we pay in form of taxes for the functioning of our country!

Now is the time for a change! We wish for and really need a better, peaceful and prosperous Pakistan, we have to vote for better representatives to do that.

I don’t care who you vote for, I am not asking you to vote for a particular political party or ideology or individual. I am just requesting you to vote! Vote for and elect the party whose manifesto matches your vision for the future of Pakistan; for the party you think is honest and determined to tackle the problems faced by this nation! It is our country, our motherland! We cannot allow corrupt, morally bankrupt people to do whatever they wish to do with our nation!

The Pakistani flag flys high in the skyPlease exercise your right and fulfill your obligation onto our nation! Stamp your ballot paper! Cast your vote! Only you have power to decide the nation’s future! Your action will write Pakistan’s destiny for the next 5 years, and your inaction will seal the country’s fate for another 5! You have been given the right and the authority to decide the future of the nation! Please use this, and use it wisely and fairly!

11th May 2013 is the opportunity and chance we have of fixing our nation, helping it stand on its feet once again, and make our great nation, great once again! I will be casting my vote… Stamping the ballot paper and putting it in the ballot box, with a believe and satisfaction that I did my part!

Democracy - Everyone is equal and respected!Democracy isn’t just casting our vote, we have to keep a check and balance over the people we chose to represent us. If the go astray, we have to remind them that we have given them the mandate and we have the ultimate, collective authority over the way our country shall be governed. Staying silent and turning a blind eye to evils, especially by our representatives is some not less than a sin! I read a quote which was something like this:

The world’s problems do not lie in the evils of a few but the silence of the many!

Its time to rise up! For our nation, for our future and for ourselves! Please cast your vote and vote wisely!

I earnestly request each and every adult Pakistani reading this to vote! If you aren’t old enough to vote, please make sure that all those around you who are, do go to the polling station and cast their vote! Share this with those around you; the least you can do is to ask your loved ones to vote!
SMS your CNIC number to 8300 and check the polling station where you have to cast your vote, and then DO vote please! For Pakistan!

Categories
Blog Published Social Issues

Are we too risk-conscious these days?

“I have this brilliant new idea! I believe it could change the way we live our lives, revolutionize the order of the society, make lives better!” popped a thought in my mind, “This just wouldn’t make lives better, people would be happier! This might be it! I could be famous, and probably rich! I will be respectable, honored all around the world! But it’s the good my idea will do for the world, for humanity that fascinates me more” We all might have had a similar thought to the one I had, but it was the fear of failure and embarrassment that probably kept us away from bringing it to reality, fulfilling our wishes, desires, dreams… Well with every great idea, there’s always that risk of failure associated.

It-Wont-Work-OutI have a friend, he really crushed on a girl, but feared approaching her, talking to her, expressing that to her… He was not shy, no, not at all, he just feared the risk of rejection. Another friend wished to be a member of the school’s student council, but the fear of the risk of rejection kept her away from applying for the post. “I just get too depressed,” she said, “if I am ever rejected.” She had given up, accepted defeat even before trying.

Successful are those people who had a vision or a dream, overlooked the risk of failure and strived on towards their goal and achieved it. We are indeed too risk conscious these days. It is probably a natural instinct, a defense mechanism that keeps us from things our subconscious mind presumes may be harmful for us; anything out of the ordinary. Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple Inc., founded the company is his parents’ garage. Years later he was fired from the company he created, but started NeXT, another computer company, because he just loved what he did, he had a passion for his work; the risk of failure that people fear was a bitter reality for him, yet he started fresh and eventually got back into and took Apple to the heights he had aimed for. He took risks, big risks, but in the end, it was all worth it.

Steve Jobs commented on this in his famous speech at the commencement at Stanford University, when he stated about getting fired from Apple:

“The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.”

Assessing the risks before we do something grand is a really good and helpful idea. It gives us an insight into what might be at stake. But is the fear of the associated risks keeping us behind?

Children often say any and everything that comes to their minds, they never hesitate; they would ask questions or pass comments that might otherwise be considered inappropriate, indecent, improper, or even blasphemous by an adult. But does that bring about any harm to that child? No! Well, even I used to ask radical, spontaneous questions as a child, and adults sometimes had a hard time answering them, or choosing the right words to answer them in an appropriate manner. Children do this because they do not associate any risk of embarrassment, risk of being stereotyped, risk of being labeled by the society. That, probably, is one of the reason why children are able to get things done the way they want.

Dare-to-FailBeing risk conscious may be a good thing at times; before investing in something new, a business conducts adequate market research. That is really essential to take ‘calculated risks’, and is beneficial to the business in the long run. Here, being risk-conscious is a good idea, for putting a lot of money at stake might not be so fascinating to the stake holders, employees and for the market at large.

It is a reality, the world today is quite risk conscious, but is this new to our times, or is it something that has been coming along from generation to generation?

Turning the pages of history text books, we do see examples of warriors and kings sometimes taking rash decisions, not taking into account any risk associated with their actions, and we see that sometimes action or inaction was based purely on the risk associated to the contrary. It has been observed that being risk conscious has had affected many of history’s important decisions, but is not the current generation’s risk consciousness just too exaggerated? Are we too risk-conscious these days?

At the level of the technological development of this era, risk calculation can also be a computable task, but that’s not what has made risk consciousness so exaggerated in the modern times, it is probably the fast paced life. We are indeed too risk conscious, but is if for the good or for the bad, that depends on how we make use of the risks we assume or calculate.

As Bill Cosby rightly said,

“In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.”


I have had written this essay for my entry into the Commonwealth Essay Competition. The topic of the essay was the 5th amongst the topics of the senior category. I choose this topic amongst the 5 because of its relevancy to the modern times, and for this very reason I have published it here.

Categories
Blog Published

St. Michael’s Inter School Science Competition 2013

St. Michael's Inter School Science Competition 2013 Logo
St. Michael’s Inter School Science Competition 2013

On 12th March 2013, St. Michael’s Convent School held its 2nd Annual St. Michael’s Inter School Science Competition.. This competition was started last year by Mr. Javed Khan, our A Levels Biology teacher. This event aims to create an awareness and interest in the A Levels Biology students about the latest research and development in the fields of medicine and biotechnology. It is indeed a perfect example of learning outside the boundaries of the class room.

The event started off a little later than planned; the opening ceremony featured the National Anthem and our School Song, followed by a recitation of the Holy Qur’an and a reading from the Holy Bible. This was followed by speeches by our Deputy Principal Mrs. Seema Naiyer and Mr. Javed Khan. This was followed by a toss to determine the order of the two rounds. The distinguished judges of the event were: Dr. Manzoor Ali Memon, Dr. Ruhina Hassan and Dr. Nisar Ali Shah.

This year, 4 teams competed in two rounds: Beaconhouse Team Proposition competed against St. Michael’s Team Opposition in the first round, and for the second round, St. Michael’s Team Proposition went against Beaconhouse Team Opposition.

The competition started off with a presentation by the first team, Beaconhouse Team Proposition, followed by a presentation by St. Michael’s Team Opposition which concluded round one of the day. After the short break, we, St. Michael’s Team Proposition opened round two, and were followed by Beaconhouse Team Opposition,

At the end of the day, after a critique over the debates and presentations by Dr. Nisar Ali Shah, the results were announced; they were as following:

  • In the first round: Beaconhouse Team Proposition beat St. Michael’s Team Opposition; and
  • In the second round: St. Michael’s Team Proposition beat Beaconhouse Team Opposition.

The results were announced in the closing ceremony, by Mr. Kevin Lobo, and the shields and medals were awarded to the participants by our respected judges.

Being one of the organizers of the event, and the leading member of the winning team: St. Michael’s Team Proposition, and lifting the trophy while wearing the gold medal at the end of the phenomenal event; I must say, it was a really proud and eventful day for me.

I would especially like to thank our Principal Mr. Peter Misquita, our Deputy Principal Mrs. Seema Naiyer Mr. Javed Khan, Mr. Kevin Lobo, Mr. Irfan Sheikh, our respected judges and the students who helped us all along to make this event a huge success. Last, but not the least, I would like to commend the efforts of all the participants; their efforts were instrumental in this phenomenal success.

Ahmer Jamil Khan

Categories
Blog Published Social Issues

An Assessment of Pakistan’s Human Rights Record

Coat of Arms of Government of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan
Govt. of Pakistan

Ever since Pakistan became a sovereign state, the issue of human rights has been one of grave importance. The partition of India in the second half of 1947 saw one of the worst massacre, as thousands of individuals were slaughtered, made homeless, raped and abused in the process of migrating to the homeland of their choice. Governments on both sides of the newly drawn borders could not do much to prevent this; they were silent spectators to one of history’s most bloody moments.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

In 1948, when the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was presented in the United Nations General Assembly; Pakistan was among the 48 states that voted for the adoption of the Declaration. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights passed that year with 48 votes in favor, no votes against it and 8 abstentions. The declaration became an integral part of Pakistan’s constitutions, all three of them, and still is an integral part of the fundamental rights enshrined in, and guaranteed and safeguarded by the current constitution.

Pakistan, however has seen much ups and downs in its political arena. The Constitution, when first suspended by the first coup d’état, saw unlawful arrests, exiling of influential political figures, and unreasonable restrictions being imposed upon the citizens, as the Martial Law administrator General Ayub Khan said that he believed in “Democracy with Discipline” (there wasn’t any democracy, just the innocent civilians being disciplined along military lines). During the era of Gen. Yahya Khan, when East Pakistan, now Bangladesh was fighting for its independence and dismemberment of Pakistan, the Pakistan Army committed severe human rights violations, which may be classified as atrocities and war crimes. The army massacred many professors scientists and doctors in the East, and was accused of rape and torturing prisoners to death.

Public  flogging in Pakistan during the Zia regime
Public flogging in Pakistan during the Zia regime – Human Rights Violation?

After Prime Minister Bhutto was ousted from office in another coup d’état, and General Zia-ul-Haq took over; the country saw its worst nightmare. The Constitution was ridiculously amended and new laws were promulgated in the process of ‘Islamization’. These new laws, aimed at legitimizing Zia regime, provided the administration far-reaching powers to suppress political activities. Public floggings became a common sight, political parties, trade unions, student unions, all were banned; those who dared to question Zia’s legitimacy or actions were tortured to death. The Hudood ordinances, provided for the punishments of victims of rape, and took away the rights of inheritance of women.

After Zia’s era, the Constitution was abrogated twice by Gen Musharraf, however this did not accompany large-scale human rights violation. Musharraf’s attempts to control the judiciary backfired, and the protests eventually lead to Musharraf leaving the country, and the presidency. The situation has improved greatly since. General elections were held in Pakistan in 2008, that saw the coming of a democratic government, which introduced the Constitution 18th Amendment act 2010, which reversed many of Zia-ul-Haq’s changes, and introduced articles, to safeguard the right of education and grant the right to a fair trial.

Islamabad Police beating up a protester
Police Brutality – quite common in Pakistan

Judiciary and the Election Commission in Pakistan are now fiercely independent; this means that the right to a fair trial and right to participate in the country’s government for all Pakistanis are now secure. Much has still to be done; prisoners are still being tortured in jails, child molestation is still taking place in underdeveloped urban areas of Pakistan, according to UNICEF reports.

Sindh Police beating a protester in Karachi
More Police Brutality – you just cannot stand up against injustice

Pakistan, although has a democratic government, there are still incidents of human rights violation by the government. The Pakistani constitution, for example, guarantees the right to freedom of expression, subject to “reasonable restrictions imposed by law in order to protect the glory of Islam…”. This provision is being used as a tool to impose censorship on media and access to Internet. YouTube, the world’s most popular video sharing platform is not in Pakistan, just because a few videos insult Islam. This action of censorship, in my humble opinion, is violation of an individual’s freedom of speech, expression, choice and right to information as granted by the universal declaration of human rights and the constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan and law.

The government has also failed to protect the right of life of its citizens; many people fall victims to target killing and terrorism each day. There have been instances of the law-enforcement agencies doing just that: in June 2011 the paramilitary forces shot dead an individual in a public park accused of armed robbery.

Protesting against Human Rights Violation in Pakistan
The poster says it all – protesting against Human Rights Violation in Pakistan

The situation of human rights abuse is improving in Pakistan, ever since the democratic forces have come to run the country. Pakistan, however has still a long way to go, before it transforms itself from a security state to a welfare state, which safeguards all the rights of its citizens without any discrimination of any kind whatsoever.

Read more about this issue:

Categories
Blog Tribute

Tribute to Bishop Emeritus Anthony Lobo

Bishop Anthony Lobo

The Founder Principal of St. Michael’s Convent School Bishop Emeritus Anthony Lobo passed away in the early hours of February 18th, 2013. The Bishop was not only the Founder of St. Michael’s Convent School, one of the most prestigious educational institutions in Karachi and in Pakistan, but a key figure in the educational development of Pakistan.

Bishop Lobo made important contributions to education in the country. He was Principal of St. Lawrence’s Boys School, Karachi and later of Saint Patrick’s High School, Karachi.

In November 1986 he founded St. Michael’s Convent School, and served as its Founder Principal.

He was the author of many books on education. In recognition of his services to the cause of literature and education, the then President of Pakistan Ghulam Ishaq Khan conferred on him the President’s “Pride of Performance ” Award in 1990.

The Bishop also served at many other positions, nationally and internationally, serving the cause of education and inter-religious dialogue and peace.

His death is a great loss, not just to the cause of education in Pakistan, but for the people of Pakistan and the world.

Categories
Blog Published Shared

CBMUN 2013


Logo of CBMUNCBMUN was held from 8th to 10th February 2013. The event was organized by the Literary and Public Speaking Society (LPSS) of the Institute of Business Management (IoBM).

Logo of DISEC at CBMUN 2013It was my honor and privilege to be the Assistant Committee Director of the First Committee of the General Assembly, DISEC, at CBMUN! Those three days were among the most treasured times of my life. I would like to thank all the members of the secretariat, the organizing committee and the LPSS for their hard work and efforts in bringing this fabulous event to life. It was a treasured memory to be with all the delegates. Here, I’d like to once again congratulate the delegates of Israel, Argentina and China on winning the best delegate awards and the delegates of Mauritania, Russia and Mexico on winning their honorary mentions; it was a well deserved victory for them! I’d like to give a special thanks to our Committee Director Hassaan Zafar, our Co Committee Director Zehra Qureshi and our ACD Sana Ameen Jan for making these three days really great for me!

On a final note, I wish all my delegates the very best of luck in any and every endurance of their lives, and success be theirs!

Ahmer Jamil Khan
ACD of DISEC
CBMUN 2013

P.S. Here is the resolution our committee passed with a 2/3 majority:

PDF-Icon
Resolution – DISEC.pdf
Download – File size: 429 KB – Format: PDF

 

Categories
Blog Social Issues Speech

Happy News: Once in a Blue Moon

I love discussions over current political situations and scenarios, read and watch the news (almost) everyday, and have friends and family to discuss the news with. It occurs to me:

Collection of negative news headlines
The most fequently seen headlines!

“Why is the news so negative

Every news-person and journalist I happened to inquire, gave me the response on these lines:

“Negative? This is reality. The world is a bad place. Bad things happen. We’re trying to make the world better by telling people about it the way it is. People murder their families. Kids and teens are kidnapped. Terrorists are trying to kill you; bomb blasts happen everyday. Dozens of people are being shot dead everyday. We’re at war. The politicians, the government, are corrupt; the army, the judiciary and agencies are plotting against you. Incredible car accidents, train wrecks and plane crashes take place on a regular basis and you need to know about them. The world is giving you cancer. Terrible plagues are on their way. Climate change is here, and we’re all going to die.”

breaking-newsWhat is wrong with all this? This is the reality we’re made to believe each time we switch on the T.V., isn’t it?

I love newspapers and TV news, and I’ve mostly seen negativity as a by-product of freedom of the press – freedom to criticize those is power and expose crime, corruption, inaction, inequality and injustices. But in the last few years, something changed. I started finding news, TV news in particular, irritating, painful, disturbing, even traumatic. Repetitive. Torturous. Paranoid. Overkill. I’d turn on Geo and hear an unrelenting charge of corruption, accusations against the government, inflation, instability, murders, deaths, explosions, disasters, tragedies, terrorists and apocalyptic predictions.

Perhaps the world has simply gotten worse in the last decade. Climate change, terrorism, hyperinflation, economic decline, and war have made the news cycle more frightening. But I don’t think viewers take issue with this type of negativity. They understand the state of the world. They watch the news.

This is what is meant by negative:

NewsCastYou see a dry, windy day, the media see climate change. You see a road, the media sees car accidents, traffic jams, and pollution. You see a protest and the media shouts that the government must go. You see a religious festival or public holiday ahead, the media alert us a terrorist attack is imminent. You see an empty street, the media see street crimes, armed robberies and target killings. You see a glass half-full, the media tell you the remaining water in that glass could be contaminated with cyanide by terrorists. You say: “Have a nice day,” the media say: “It started off as a nice day, but it ended in murder, car accidents, a fire, bank robberies, a frightening new trend and arrests. Detailed news after the break.”

If you had a friend who talked like TV news, you’d probably think that friend was an idiot, paranoid, hyper, morbid, manic and clinically depressed.

Television networks, particularly 24-hour news networks, come alive when a war starts. This is no accident. War reporting is one of journalism’s core assignments and, not accidentally, the greatest driver of ratings.

War and its attendant horrors might have forged and woven the very fabric of journalism. Some people say that the popular inverted pyramid reporting style has its roots in war. War reporters, always fearful of having their stories cut off by the telegraph, wrote stories in a hierarchy of carnage where the deaths came first, followed by injuries.

While this theory is disputed, the pyramid style persists and has a led to an obsession with body counts and violence. Stories are more important if more people die, and readers find that news stories trail off without any kind of … conclusion. They’ll show you an accident, but they won’t tell you why it happened or how to prevent it next time.

And the very language of journalism is said to have come from war. A politician will face a “barrage of questions,” bills are “torpedoed” and exciting new books are “explosive.” In Pakistan, the evening news has something related to this: “Today, 15 people were shot dead in different parts of Karachi” being accompanied by images of an ambulance being sent off from the crime scene, the traumatized victim or his/her dead body being moved around in the hospital and finally scenes of crying and wailing women and then men. After the final ‘sensational’ development of the news, the channels would lay claims that they were the first ones to break the news first to you.

The number of dead are reported in this manner: “The explosion claimed 31 lives, which included 24 women and children”. 31 and 24 seen quite high together, a psychological effect intended at creating a sensation, and spark interest (read: horror) among the viewers, to keep them glued to their seats, make them depressed.

EVERYTHING IS FINE!
If everything was fine, would you read the newspaper?

Perhaps people have gotten hooked on negative news the way people got hooked on junk food. And here is perhaps the most popular argument in favor of media negativity. It’s what the people want. But is it really?

Good and happy news are flashed on the TV too, like winning a cricket or hockey match, but isn’t that too short lived, and not given the attention it duly deserves? Would you like to listen to any good news?

If the media are too negative, there is one person who might have the power and the ideas to change it.

That’s you!